~Neil Hamilton~

Born: September 9, 1899 in Lynn, Massachusetts, USA
Died: September 24, 1984 in Escondido, California, USA
~Silent Filmography~
The Studio Murder Mystery (1929) .... Tony White
Why Be Good? (1929) .... Peabody Jr.
What a Night! (1928) .... Joe Madison
Three Weekends (1928) .... James Gordon
... aka Three Week Ends (USA: poster title)
Take Me Home (1928) .... David North
The Patriot (1928) .... Crown Prince Alexander
Hot News (1928) .... Scoop Morgan
The Grip of the Yukon (1928) .... Jack Elliott
Don't Marry (1928) .... Henry Willoughby
Something Always Happens (1928) .... Roderick Keswick
The Showdown (1928) .... Wilson Shelton
Mother Machree (1928) .... Brian McHugh/Brian van Studdiford
The Shield of Honor (1927) .... Jack MacDowell
The Spotlight (1927) .... Norman Brooke
The Joy Girl (1927) .... John Jeffrey Fleet
Ten Modern Commandments (1927) .... Tod Gilbert
The Music Master (1927) .... Beverly Cruger
The Great Gatsby (1926) .... Nick Carraway
Diplomacy (1926) .... Julian Weymouth
Beau Geste (1926) .... Digby Geste ... Movie Still Code: 925-X
Desert Gold (1926) .... George Thorne
The Splendid Crime (1925) .... Bob Van Dyke
New Brooms (1925) .... Thomas Bates Jr.
The Golden Princess (1925) .... Tennessee Hunter
The Street of Forgotten Men (1925) .... Philip Peyton
The Little French Girl (1925)
Men and Women (1925) .... Ned Seabury
Isn't Life Wonderful (1924) .... Paul
The Side Show of Life (1924) .... Charles Verity-Stewart
The Sixth Commandment (1924) .... Robert Fields
America (1924) .... Nathan Holden
... aka Love and Sacrifice (UK)
The White Rose (1923) .... John White

The Great Romance (1919)
The Beloved Impostor (1918)
~The Los Angeles Times~
October 3, 1984
Neil Hamilton was a dashing leading man during an epoch of sensuous silent films but much better
known to contemporary generations as the silver-haired and slightly befuddled police commissioner
on television's "Batman."

By the time sound was melded with moving pictures in 1928, Hamilton had become Paramount's
leading male star. By then his feature credits had passed the two-dozen mark. He made more than
80 films during his career.

His final film was "Which Way to the Front?" in 1970.

— Burt A. Folkart in the Los Angeles Times Oct. 3, 1984
.